Two New Ruger Handguns Released Pre-NRA Annual Meeting

Sturm, Ruger & Co. released two new handgun models on Friday. The first was an addition to the LCRx line in .22 LR and the second was their a laser-integrated version of their LCP II.

The LCRx is the exposed external hammer version of the LCR. Previously only available in .38 Special +P and .357 Magnum, the new LCRx in .22 LR features a 3″ barrel, 8-shot capacity, adjustable rear sights, Hogue Tamer grips, and the other features that made the LCR famous. Given all of this, it has the makings of a updated and more modern kit gun at an MSRP about $200 less than the S&W Model 317 Kit Gun.

The specs on the LCRx in .22 LR are here.

The second new handgun model is the LCP II with a factory-installed Viridian E-Series red laser. What makes this really interesting is that the laser is from Viridian and not from Crimson Trace. Ruger had for years worked with Crimson Trace on grip-integrated lasers as well as frame-integrated laser. This is just speculation on my part but the purchase of Crimson Trace by competitor Smith & Wesson undoubtedly played a part in switching to Viridian lasers.

The specs on the LCP II with Viridian E-Series laser are here. The addition of the Viridian laser adds $90 to the MSRP of the LCP II bringing it up to $439. That’s not too bad and having a laser in such a small gun would be a plus in my humble opinion.

All in all, Ruger has two new winners here. I’m anxious to see what is released at the end of the month in Atlanta at the NRA Annual Meeting.

SHOT SHOT Day One – Gunblast.Com

Jeff Quinn in this report on Day One of the SHOT Show starts off with a great interview of Ruger CEO Mike Fifer. The other highlights were a Colt representative talking about the reintroduced Colt Cobra and a discussion by Linda Powell of Mossberg’s new 590 Shockwave shotgun. This latter product is quite interesting in that it is a pistol-gripped 14″ shotgun that does not require a NFA tax stamp.

To read more about the Mossberg 590 Shockwave, go here.  Ammoland.com does report that the shotgun is sold with this disclaimer:

Disclaimer: Although the Mossberg 590 Shockwave is classified as a “firearm” under the Gun Control Act of 1968 (GCA), and is not subject to the provisions of the National Firearms Act (NFA), state and local laws may be more restrictive. Even though, it is legal federally, the 590 Shockwave may be considered a “short-barreled” shotgun or “assault weapon” by certain state and local laws; and therefore illegal to possess. Please check with your local authorities concerning the legality of possessing a firearm of this configuration.

Checking North Carolina law, 14 NCGS § 14-288.8.(c)(3) classifies a shotgun as a “weapon of mass death and destruction” if it has “a barrel or barrels of less than 18 inches in length or an overall length of less than 26 inches.” If you have a Federal tax stamp then possession of such a shotgun is permitted. As I read this – and I’m not a lawyer – the shotgun must be both greater than 26 inches overall in length and must have a barrel of 18 inches in length or greater. By using “or” instead of “and” in the description of such a prohibited shotgun the legislative intent is that both conditions must be met. This leads me to say that this is a law that needs changing as I’d like one of those shotguns!


UPDATE: Regarding North Carolina law and the legality of possessing the Mossberg Shockwave, I received this message on Facebook from fellow blogger Chris Maynard.

It is not a shotgun because it never had a stock, rather a pistol grip from the factory… If it was under 26″ in length, it would be an AOW… But over 26″ makes it a “firearm”… Per federal law…

So that should mean that it is not restricted by NC law supposing they follow the federal definition of “shotgun”

But the same statute also restricts ” Any type of weapon (other than a shotgun or a shotgun shell of a type particularly suitable for sporting purposes) which will, or which may be readily converted to, expel a projectile by the action of an explosive or other propellant, and which has any barrel with a bore of more than one-half inch in diameter” so this gun should qualify under that.

Ruger GP-100 In .44 Special

One of the firearms that I had hoped to shoot at Industry Day at the Range was the new Ruger GP-100 in .44 Special. As events conspired to keep me from the SHOT Show, I am relying on my friend Rob Reed’s post about it at AllOutdoor.com.

His impression:

I was able to put a few rounds through the gun and my initial impressions were favorable. The trigger was good in double-action and very good in single-action and the rubber grips absorbed the recoil of the standard pressure .44 Special rounds very well. Since it is based on the tank-like GP 100 I’m sure it will handle the hotter .44 Special loads that approach Magnum territory as well.

He also included this video of the Ruger representative going over the specs of the revolver.

You can read more about the specifications of this new revolver at Ruger’s website here.

If you subscribe to Guns Magazine, Massad Ayoob has a very complimentary review of this new revolver in this month’s issue (March 2017).

Ruger Redhawk In .45 ACP And .45 Colt

Now this is interesting. Ruger is getting into the .45 ACP revolver game. They have just announced a new version of the Ruger Redhawk that will handle both the .45 ACP with moon clips and the .45 Colt.

The specs are below:

Model Number: 5032 | Caliber: 45 Auto / 45 Colt
Material: Stainless Steel Finish: Satin Stainless
Front Sight: Ramp Rear Sight: Adjustable
Barrel Length: 4.2″ Overall Length: 9.50″
Weight: 44.00 oz. Grips: Lasered Hardwood
Twist: 1:16″ RH Grooves: 6
MA Approved & Certified: No CA Approved: No
Capacity: 6 Suggested Retail: $1029.00

It’s a bit pricey but they are still making double action revolvers unlike the bankrupt Colt. I have a couple Ruger revolvers and they are solid, well-made handguns.

UPDATE: Ed Head has part one of his review of the Ruger Redhawk in .45 ACP/.45 Colt up. Ed is one of the people that Ruger sends firearms to so that they can be wrung out before launch.

A Couple Of Tidbits From Ruger’s Quarterly Report

After the close of the stock market yesteday, Sturm, Ruger & Co. released their quarterly earnings report. Below are a couple of tidbits that I gleaned from it which I thought were interesting.

  • In the first quarter of 2015, net sales and the estimated sell-through of the Company’s products
    from the independent distributors to retailers increased 12% and 15%, respectively, from the
    fourth quarter of 2014. The National Instant Criminal Background Check System background
    checks (as adjusted by the National Shooting Sports Foundation) decreased 15% during the
    same period.

  • New products, including the AR-556 modern sporting rifle and the LC9s pistol, represented
    $22.8 million or 17% of firearm sales in the first quarter of 2015. New product sales include
    only major new products that were introduced in the past two years.

It looks like Ruger has done well even if the market has contracted somewhat. It would be interesting to know how much of the new sales were attributable to the AR-556 and how much to the LC9s. With the market demands for ARs cooling somewhat if prices are any indication, I’m guessing the LC9s represented more than 50% of the $22.8 million in sales.

Ruger holds it annual shareholder’s meeting this morning. It is being webcast and you can see it at this link.

Ruger Getting Into 10/22 After-Market Trigger Business

Ruger is getting into the 10/22 replacement trigger market. They just announced the BX-Trigger which is a drop-in trigger module for the 10/22. It reduces the trigger pull from approximately 6 pounds to 2.5 pounds. The BX-Trigger will go on the market starting this Friday. It will be available directly from Ruger and from many retailers. The MSRP on the BX-Trigger is $89.95.

If I had to guess, someone at Ruger realized that they could be making good money in the 10/22 after-market parts business that they were losing to companies like Volquartsen. I don’t know without testing how the new BX-Trigger will compare to the Volquartsen components but the complete module sells for about what Volquartsen sells their match hammer and sear.

The release from Ruger is below:

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE: RGR) announces the launch of the BX-Trigger™: a light, crisp, “drop-in” replacement trigger assembly that is compatible with all Ruger® 10/22® rifles and 22 Charger™ pistols. The BX-Trigger is a Genuine Ruger Factory Accessory and is the perfect upgrade for all 10/22 rifles and 22 Charger pistol models because of the significantly reduced pull weight of approximately 2.75 pounds (versus 6 pounds on the standard 10/22 trigger).

“We have made continuous improvements to the 10/22 over the years, but the BX-Trigger is an exciting performance advancement,” said Ruger President and COO, Chris Killoy. “The BX-Trigger was designed for easy installation, superior performance, and legendary Ruger reliability. Like the popular BX-25® magazine for the 10/22, the BX-Trigger will deliver the excellence and value that shooters have come to expect from Ruger.”

The BX-Trigger is sold as a complete assembly that “drops in” to replace the existing trigger assembly, with no additional adjustment or “fitting” required. A video of the installation process can be found at Ruger.com/BX-Trigger

Beginning December 19, the Ruger BX-Trigger will be available for purchase directly from Ruger at ShopRuger.com or from local independent firearms retailers.

Ruger Recalls Some American Rimfire Rifles

Ruger has announced a safety recall of some of their American Rimfire rifles in .17 HMR and .22 WMRF (Magnum) manufactured between November 17, 2013 and January 8, 2014. The recall is due to the lack of a hole that vents gas in case of an obstruction or case rupture.

From Ruger:

WHY ARE YOU RECALLING THESE RIFLES
We have determined that Ruger American Rimfire™ rifles chambered in .22 WMRF (Magnum) and .17 HMR manufactured between November 17, 2013 and January 8, 2014 were manufactured without a vent hole. This hole appears just below and behind the serial number on the left-hand side of the receiver. The hole does not serve any function during normal operation of the rifle, but is a safety feature and may help vent gas in the event of a problem such as a ruptured case head or bore obstruction, for example. We want to recall the rifles and add the vent hole.

How to determine if your rifle needs the retrofit
First, only Ruger American Rimfire™ rifles chambered in .22 WMRF (Magnum) and .17 HMR within the serial number range 830-34831 to 830-43880 are subject to the recall. If your rifle is chambered in .22 LR or falls outside of this serial number range, it is not subject to the recall. If you do have an Ruger American Rimfire™ rifle chambered in .22 WMRF (Magnum) or .17 HMR, you need only examine the left side of the receiver, just below and behind the serial number. If there is a hole there (Figure 1), then you do not need to return the rifle. If there is no hole (Figure 2), then the rifle should be returned.

For instructions on how to return a rifle without the vent hole, go to this Ruger webpage.

H/T Old NFO at The Gun Blog Black List

Ruger Comes To North Carolina And Does Good

Ruger comes to North Carolina, builds rifles, and then does good for the community. Is this the picture of an evil company that builds “instruments of war” so that kids can kill one another on our city streets? Of course, it isn’t and Ruger doesn’t build instruments of war either. Instead it is the picture of a company that opens a new plant in a semi-rural location and then seeks to help out the community.

Though production wasn’t originally expected to begin at Ruger’s new Mayodan, North Carolina plant until the first quarter of 2014, it actually began ahead of schedule in 2013. Ruger is taking five of the Ruger American Rimfire Rifles that were produced in the first production run and auctioning them off for five local charities in the Rockingham County – northern Guilford County area. Ruger will also be making the rest of that first run of 1,000 rifles available for sale only in the Carolinas.

Ruger’s announcement regarding the charities and the link to the auction is below:

Ruger To Auction First Production Run Ruger American Rimfire™ Rifles From Mayodan, NC


March 14, 2014


In September 2013, Ruger finalized the purchase of a 220,000 square foot facility in Mayodan, NC. This was the Company’s first major expansion in over 25 years, and production was expected to begin during the first quarter of 2014. Production actually began late Fall of 2013! The boxes of the first 1,000 rifles were affixed with a special “First Production Run” sticker. Rifles with serial numbers 832-01001 through 832-02000 were the only ones to leave the factory with this special sticker. We are auctioning five of those rifles. The other 995 rifles were circulated through distribution in the Carolinas only.

The serial numbers of these auction rifles are: 832-01920; 832-01931; 832-01940; 832-01958 and 832-01960. The testfire date for all five is December 3, 2013. 100% of the proceeds from each of these auctions will be donated to the following five local organizations: Camp Carefree, Stokesdale, NC; the Salvation Army, Mayodan, NC; Reformers Unanimous, Stoneville, NC; the American Cancer Society, Rockingham Co., NC; and the Western Rockingham Firefighters Association, Mayodan, NC.

The Ruger American Rimfire™ rifle is made of alloy steel with a satin blued finish and features a 22-inch barrel, fiber optic front sight and adjustable rear sight. The stock is black composite and includes two interchangeable stock modules that provide comb height options for scope or sight use. It also features the detachable, flush-mounted 10/22® BX-1 10-round rotary magazine. Included in the auction is an original instruction manual, marketing materials and an extra “First Production Run” sticker. To learn more about this auction, visit www.ruger.com/auction.

Stepping Up To The Plate In California

As I reported earlier this month, both Ruger and Smith & Wesson have taken a stand against the California Department of Justice Handgun Roster by letting numerous popular models of their handguns drop off the list. In other words, they refuse to make a California-only model that includes a microstamped firing pin.

Now Mike Fifer and James Debney, the CEOs of Ruger and Smith & Wesson respectively, have filed Declarations in support of the plaintiffs challenging the Handgun Roster in the long-running case of Pena v. Lindley. This is a case being brought by the CalGuns Foundation and the Second Amendment Foundation in US District Court for the Eastern District of California.

The Declaration of Ruger CEO Mike Fifer can be found here. In it he says that the microstamping requirement is unworkable and that no firearms manufacturer has been able to implement it.

The Declaration of S&W CEO James Debney says that the technology is unworkable and that “the state law requires the technology to perform at a level it cannot.” Debney goes on to point out that many of their handguns also do not have mag disconnects and loaded chamber indicators.

These Declarations join the amicus curie brief of Glock, Inc. in arguing against the Handgun Roster and in favor of the plaintiffs’ position.

The Second Amendment Foundation welcomed the support from all three firearms manufacturers in a release put out yesterday shown below.

SAF THANKS GUN COMPANIES FOR
SUPPORT IN CA MICROSTAMPING CASE

BELLEVUE, WA – The Second Amendment Foundation is expressing heartfelt gratitude today to three major firearms companies – Ruger, Smith & Wesson and Glock – for their supporting documents in the on-going case of Pena v. Lindley, a lawsuit challenging the California handgun roster requirements that include microstamping and magazine disconnects.

Earlier this week, Ruger CEO Michael O. Fifer and Smith & Wesson President and CEO James Debney submitted declarations to the court, explaining their respective companies’ positions on the California microstamping requirement. Late last year, attorneys representing Glock, Inc. filed an amicus curiae brief supporting the SAF case.

“SAF will be eternally grateful for the timely support from all three companies, which we believe strongly reinforces our case,” said SAF founder and Executive Vice President Alan M. Gottlieb. “The statements from Messrs. Debney and Fifer confirm what we have argued all along, that California’s requirements place an undue burden on both consumers and manufacturers.”

In his statement, Fifer bluntly observed, “There is no workable microstamping technology today, and Ruger believes that California’s microstamping regulations make compliance impossible.”

Debney concurs in his statement, noting, “Smith & Wesson does not believe it is possible currently to comply with California’s microstamping regulations. Quite simply, the state law requires the technology to perform at a level that it cannot.”

In its earlier brief, submitted by attorneys Erik S. Jaffe of Washington, D.C. and John C. Eastman of Orange, Calif., Glock maintained that neither its pistols nor any other handgun in common use can comply with California’s microstamping mandate.

“You cannot regulate handguns out of existence or out of the marketplace by mandating technology that doesn’t work,” Gottlieb observed. “Now three major gun companies have weighed in and we’re confident their opinions will carry a lot of weight.”

The impact of the microstamping requirement on handguns available for sale in California can be seen in this infographic from the CalGuns Foundation.  It is not a pretty picture and not a Constitutional one in my opinion.

Ruger CEO Mike Fifer Clarifies Why They Are Leaving California Market

As I reported yesterday in the infographic on the California Handgun Roster, Ruger is reportedly going to let all their semi-automatic pistols drop off the approved Handgun Roster. Today, Ruger CEO Mike Fifer clarified this in an interview with Guns.com.

“We’re being forced out of the state by the California Department of Justice,” explained Fifer. “This insistence on microstamping, which doesn’t work, is denying you your rights to have access to these guns.”


“We’re not abandoning the [California] market at all, we are trying our hardest to stay in the market,” he continued. “We’re committed to California and we’re fighting this every inch of the way.”


In other words, they’re not abandoning their fans, enthusiasts and customers in California. They’re going to do whatever they can to see that this inane law gets struck down.