NC Wildlife Resources Commission Warns About CWD

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has been discovered in whitetail deer in western Tennessee. This fatal neurological disease does not affect humans or livestock but it can infect deer and other cervids such as elk, moose, and caribou. Obviously, North Carolina does not have a population of moose or caribou but it does have a lot of whitetail deer and a growing population of reintroduced elk.

Below is the advisory from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission along with the rules to for bringing in vension, deer hides, skulls, antlers, and mounts from other states. They also have a YouTube video for instructions on how to prep a carcass for importation if you are a do-it-yourself’er.

RALEIGH, N.C. (Dec. 17, 2018) — With the preliminary detection of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in white-tailed deer in western Tennessee, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission reminds deer hunters of a new rule that prohibits the importation of whole deer carcasses and restricts the importation of specific carcass parts from anywhere outside of North Carolina.
The new rule, which was implemented for the 2018-19 deer hunting season, is an effort on the Commission’s part to prevent the spread of CWD into the state. CWD is a transmissible, always fatal, neurological disease that affects deer and other cervids such as elk, moose and reindeer/caribou.
The rule states that anyone transporting cervid carcass parts into North Carolina must follow processing and packaging regulations, which only allow the importation of:
  • Meat that has been boned out such that no pieces or fragments of bone remain;
  • Caped hides with no part of the skull or spinal column attached;
  • Antlers, antlers attached to cleaned skull plates, or cleaned skulls free from meat, or brain tissue;
  • Cleaned lower jawbone(s) with teeth or cleaned teeth; or
  • Finished taxidermy products and tanned hides.
Additionally, all carcass part(s) or container of cervid meat or carcass parts must be labeled or identified with the:
  • Name and address of individual importing carcass parts;
  • State, Canadian province, or foreign country of origin;
  • Date the cervid was killed; and
  • Hunter’s license number, permit number, or equivalent identification from the state, Canadian province, or foreign country of origin.
These new restrictions aim to prevent the infectious agent of CWD from contaminating new environments by way of disposal of carcass tissues, particularly those of the brain and spine, as CWD contaminants can persist in the soil for years.
On Friday, officials with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) announced they were enacting their Chronic Wasting Disease Response Plan, following the preliminary positive detections of CWD in white-tailed deer in Hardeman and Fayette counties, which border the Mississippi state line. TWRA biologists are testing additional deer and are trying to contact the hunters who harvested the infected deer.
Out of concern for the serious effects CWD could have on North Carolina’s deer herd, the Commission developed a Chronic Wasting Disease Response Plan in 2002, with subsequent revisions over the years to respond to the disease’s ever-growing spread. The plan identifies and guides the agency’s initial short-term (approximately one year) efforts if CWD is detected in the state’s deer herd, or if CWD is detected in deer within 30 miles of its borders. Agency biologists also conduct statewide sampling of deer every year and attempt to sample all deer that show signs of the disease or die of unknown causes.
With Tennessee’s preliminary detection of CWD within its borders, two states bordering North Carolina will have CWD in their deer herds. In Virginia, Shenandoah and Frederick counties, which border West Virginia, have confirmed cases of CWD.
About Chronic Wasting Disease
Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) disease in deer, elk, moose and reindeer/caribou and is always fatal. The source of the disease is an abnormal prion (a form of protein) that collects in the animal’s brain cells. These brain cells eventually burst, leaving behind microscopic empty spaces in the brain matter that give it a “spongy” look. As this occurs, it often causes behavior changes such as decreased interactions with other animals, listlessness, lowering of the head, a blank facial expression, and walking in set patterns.
CWD has no known impacts to the health of humans or livestock. However, the Commission recommends people do NOT eat:
  • Meat from a deer that looks sick
  • Any of the following organs: brain, eyes, spinal cord, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes*
  • Any meat from an animal that tests positive for the disease
*Normal field dressing coupled with boning out a carcass will remove most (if not all) of these body parts. Cutting away all fatty tissue will remove remaining lymph nodes.

Cornell University Says Kill The Townies

In the battle between town and gown, Cornell University is going after the townies and they want them killed.

You can relax a little. Cornell isn’t trying to kill local Ithaca conservatives though it may have crossed the mind of some campus radicals. The Ithaca townies in this case are not the two legged variety but rather the four-legged cloven-hoofed variety with flashy white tails.

It seems that Cornell University is overrun with whitetail deer. You need to remember that Cornell is a weird hybrid in that it is both a liberal arts Ivy League school and a land-grant university with many test farms. It is this latter part of the campus that is the great attraction to the deer combining as it does food, shelter, and lack of predators.

According to a report by Professor William Jacobson at the Legal Insurrection, the university came up with a two-part plan to control the great numbers of deer attracted to its campus. In a move that would warm the cockles of Sandra Fluke’s heart, on-campus deer are given free, permanent birth control. They got tubal ligations. Meanwhile, off-campus deer were subject to a controlled hunting program with emphasis on killing does.

The plan was an expensive failure as Professor Jacobson describes in this interview with Cam Edwards.

Republicans Are Bigger Killers

I haven’t gone all lefty and joined with Ladd over at CSGV. I promise! Actually, I’m referring to a story in the Madison, Wisconsin Capital Times about the deer hunting prowess of the Republicans in the Wisconsin State Senate as compared to that of the Democrats.

Republicans in the Wisconsin state Senate had the magic touch this deer hunting season, bagging more deer than their colleagues in the Assembly and all their Democratic colleagues combined.

Of the 18 Senate Republicans, Terry Moulton of Chippewa Falls, Dale Schultz of Richland Center, Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald of Juneau, Richard Gudex of Fond du Lac, Sheila Harsdorf of River Falls, Neal Kedzie of Elkhorn and Paul Farrow of Pewaukee went hunting over the eight-day gun deer season that ended Dec. 1.

Fitzgerald, Harsdorf, Kedzie and Gudex each got a deer.

“I guess we’re a better shot,” joked Gudex, who bagged an 8-point buck on opening day.

Of the Democrats in both the Senate and Assembly, none were successful this year.

I do like the comments of Rep. Dianne Hesselbein (D-Middleton) as to why she went hunting for the first time and on her experience.

A freshman lawmaker elected in 2012, Hesselbein told herself if she was made a member of the Assembly Natural Resources and Sporting Heritage Committee, she would go deer hunting.

She was, so she did. She borrowed a 20-gauge shotgun and practiced shooting at the Dane County range. But the only animal she saw in the woods was a squirrel. She said she was surprised by the fact that she enjoyed the experience.

“You have to be so quiet. You can’t even check email,” Hesselbein said. “You just get to sit and look at the beauty of Wisconsin.”

The Things You Can Get At Wally World

You can get darn near anything at your local Walmart including, it seems, a 10-point buck.

That was the case at the Burrell Township, Pennsylvania store back in November on the opening day of deer season. Arcangelo Bianco Jr. had just pulled into Walmart when the 10-point buck came around the corner of the building. Not one to let an opportunity like this go to waste, Mr. Bianco hopped out of his truck and started firing at it with his pistol. And there begins his troubles.

From the Indiana (PA) Gazette:

Which is why Arcangelo Bianco Jr., 40, finds himself in trouble with the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

According to the commission, Bianco fired several rounds at a hapless white-tailed deer from within the Burrell Township store’s parking lot and bagged the animal on the other side of Old William Penn Highway (Old Route 22) one afternoon last November.

The most serious of the charges he faces is a misdemeanor count of reckless endangerment. He also was slapped with five summary offenses, all hunting law violations, including hunting without a license, shooting on or across highways and unlawful killing or taking of big game.

“Obviously, we can’t have someone running through a Walmart parking lot shooting at a deer,” said Jack Lucas, the wildlife conservation officer who investigated the incident.

After killing the deer, Mr. Bianco loaded it up in his truck and took it to the local meat processor to be butchered. Unfortunately, he didn’t get to keep it as it was seized as evidence in the case. Officer Lucas notes that the deer and surveillance footage from the Walmart security cameras will be used as evidence in court. He also said that the buck that Mr. Bianco shot was probably the best he’d seen in the last two years in Indiana County.

I guess the moral of the story is that just because you can get something at Walmart doesn’t mean you should.

UPDATE: CBS Pittsburgh is also covering the story and they have video of the Walmart. I like the comments of the District Attorney who says that they are a big hunting community and that people who are legitimate hunters are upset about the incident. Mr. Bianco is also charged with violations of game laws as they carry stiffer penalties. He faces his first hearing on May 1st.

Deer Versus Plane

In the battle between a whitetail deer and a Department of Homeland Security jet, neither won. The deer is dead and all that remains of the jet is part of the cockpit and nose.

Just before noon on Saturday, a plane identified as a Cessna C550 (Citation II) jet hit a deer with its left wing as it was landing at Greenwood (SC) County Airport. After hitting the deer, the plane burst into flames. Fortunately, the pilot and the sole passenger were able to exit safely.

It appears the plane belonged either to DHS or to the Border Patrol. The news stories are somewhat conflicting on this. However, Greenwood County Sheriff Tony Davis did say that it carried surveillance equipment.

Davis
could not identify the type of plane or where it came from, but said
that it carried sophisticated surveillance equipment that can be used in
a variety of operations — including border control and marijuana
eradication operations.

Read more: http://www.wyff4.com/news/local-news/abbeville-greenwood-news/Plane-burns-after-colliding-with-deer/-/9654572/17457632/-/31jbgt/-/index.html#ixzz2CcOQg5sy

 Davis could not identify the type of plane or where it came from, but said that it carried sophisticated surveillance equipment that can be used in a variety of operations – including border control and marijuana eradication operations.

Now I wonder just what they planned on “surveilling” in the Upstate of South Carolina. Maybe they were looking for the moonshine still of Bill and Josh who star on the Discovery Channel’s Moonshiners. Or maybe they just happened to be landing at the wrong airport at the wrong time. I guess we’ll find out when the FAA who are reported to be investigating the crash release their report.

Davis
could not identify the type of plane or where it came from, but said
that it carried sophisticated surveillance equipment that can be used in
a variety of operations — including border control and marijuana
eradication operations.

Read more: http://www.wyff4.com/news/local-news/abbeville-greenwood-news/Plane-burns-after-colliding-with-deer/-/9654572/17457632/-/31jbgt/-/index.html#ixzz2CcOQg5sy

Davis
could not identify the type of plane or where it came from, but said
that it carried sophisticated surveillance equipment that can be used in
a variety of operations — including border control and marijuana
eradication operations.

Read more: http://www.wyff4.com/news/local-news/abbeville-greenwood-news/Plane-burns-after-colliding-with-deer/-/9654572/17457632/-/31jbgt/-/index.html#ixzz2CcOQg5sy