It’s Not Just Ammo You Can’t Find Anymore

Anyone who has gone into a gun, hardware, big box, or sporting goods store knows that ammunition is in short supply. This includes trying to obtain it from places like LuckyGunner.com.

I know I’m not telling you anything you don’t already know.

Reloading supplies are scarce as well. This is especially true for primers.

Again, I’m not telling you anything you don’t already know.

However, try to find the shell holders for the more common rifle calibers. I’m looking for a shell holder that fits a .30-06 Springfield. That is the parent cartridge of a number of other rounds such as the .270 Winchester, the .35 Whelen, the .25-06, and the .338-06.

Good luck!

Cabelas? No!

MidwayUSA? Nyet!

Brownells? Non!

BassPro Shop? Nope!

Graf & Sons? Nein!

Amazon? Only if you are willing to pay almost four times MSRP.

EBay? Used only and sold prices are $22 and up plus shipping.

Now if you are looking for shell holders for such popular cartridges as the .303 Savage, the .303 British, or that safari favorite of years gone-by the 6.5×54 Mannlicher-Schoenauer, you are in luck.

A Correction On NRA Bylaws

Sometime since 2019, the NRA bylaws as they relate to called Special Meetings was changed and the time for notice considerably shortened.

From Article IV, Sec. 3 (b):

Special Meetings. A special meeting of the Board of Directors may be held at any time on the call of The President, or by action of the Executive Committee, or upon demand in writing stating the object of the proposed meeting and signed by not less than a majority of the Board. Notice of the time, place and object of such special meetings shall be transmitted to each Director at least seven days before the date of holding such a meeting in person, or 72 hours before any special meeting held by means of a conference telephone or similar communications technology pursuant to subsection (f) of this section.

Thus, I stand corrected on my comments on the update to the post on NRA Special Meetings that referenced the former 30-day notice requirement. The Special Meeting being held on March 14th would be valid under the bylaws as amended. Lest you think I was informed of this by a “friend of Wayne”, it came from Rob Pincus who is not.

I do wonder when this bylaw was changed and why. I do know that it was not voted on at either of the last two Meeting of Members as I attended both of those from start to finish.

I still anticipate that the Board of Directors will be asked to approve the bankruptcy filing ex post facto as seems to be the norm when called out on something.

124th Anniversary of Bottled In Bond Act

March 3rd marks the 124th anniversary of Congress passing the Bottled in Bond Act of 1897. It was one of the first consumer protection laws passed and preceded the Pure Drug and Food Act by almost a decade.

When the 54th Congress passed this act, they set standards for distilled spirits that had to be met in order to qualify as “bottled in bond”. While we tend to think of bottled in bond as it refers to bourbon, there are rye, corn whiskey, and apple brandy bottled in bond spirits as well.

To be qualify as bottled in bond, the distilled spirit must:

  • Be bottled at 100 proof
  • Aged for a minimum of four years
  • Distillation must be from one distillery only
  • It was distilled in one distilling season (fall or spring) only
  • The name of the distiller must be on the label
  • Must identify the bottling location if different from the location of the distiller or distillery
  • Only pure water could be added

If a distilled spirit met those qualifications, a green stamp was put on the bottle as a measure of its quality. The law had very strict penalties for counterfeiting these stamps. This law in now codified in the Code of Federal Regulations under Title 27 CFR 5.42.

The Whiskey Professor, Bernie Lubbers, is quite the fan of BIB bourbons and whiskies. He calls it, “the most restricted of the most restricted whiskies!”

So, for that matter, am I! At last count, and I could be wrong on this, I think I have 10 or 11 different bottles of bottled in bond bourbon and corn whiskey. To the great consternation of the Complementary Spouse, I’m always on the lookout for a new one – even though it would take me years to finish the bourbon I have on hand.

Probably the most famous, at least in the movies, is J.T.S. Brown BIB. It was the bourbon that Fast Eddie Felson wanted in the The Hustler.

So on this, the 124th anniversary of the Bottled in Bond Act, let us lift a glass filled preferably with something bottled in bond to Congress actually getting something right for once.

NRA Special Meeting (Update)

Rumors started on Sunday with a report by Dan Zimmerman of TTAG about Wayne LaPierre’s speech to CPAC. After saying that Wayne’s speech was old and stale, he concluded with this teaser, “The good news is, we happen to know that the NRA is actively seeking his replacement.”

Then yesterday, John Crump who writes for Ammoland.com had a tweet saying to “prepare for some big NRA news on or around March 14.”

The March 14th date was interesting because there was no hearing set on that date in either the NY Attorney General’s dissolution case nor in the NRA’s bankruptcy case.

It turns out that NRA President Carolyn Meadows has called for a special meeting of the Board of Directors to be held in Dallas on March 14th.

March 2, 2021

                                                                  OFFICIAL NOTICE

                                SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

TO:      Board of Directors and Executive Council

            The NRA President has called for a special meeting of the Board of Directors to take place on Sunday, March 14, 2021, at 10:00 a.m. in Dallas, Texas.  The sole purpose of the meeting is to provide a briefing to the Board regarding the NRA’s reorganization plan and the legal matters overseen by the Special Litigation Committee, and to take any necessary action directly related to those matters.

   The NRA Board of Directors and Executive Council and will meet at the Omni Dallas Hotel, 555 South Lamar Street, Dallas, Texas 75202, (214) 744-6664.  The date, time and location of all meetings are on the attached schedule of meetings and meals.  [Special Note:  The special meeting of the Board of Directors will start at 10:00 a.m. Daylight Savings Time on Sunday, March 14. Daylight Savings Time begins at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday, March 14.  On Saturday night, remember to set your clocks forward one hour (i.e., losing one hour) to “spring ahead.”]

Members in attendance are authorized reimbursement for ordinary and necessary expenses actually incurred on the following basis:

If I had to speculate – and that is always a dangerous thing – I would say that it is a move to get the Board of Directors to explicitly approve the filing for bankruptcy. You may remember that Judge Phillip Journey made the point in his motion for a court-appointed examiner that the directors’ never voted to file bankruptcy. Further, bankruptcy law expert Prof. Adam Levitin wondered if the Board had shirked its fiduciary duties by not explicitly approving a bankruptcy filing.

As the after the fact approval of many expenditures by the Board’s Audit Committee makes clear, the NRA Board has a history of approving things after the fact that should have had explicit pre-approval. This could be one of those ex post facto approvals. I would be the most surprised person in the room if it was actually to announce a replacement to Wayne LaPierre. I just don’t see a Board packed with Wayne loyalists doing that.

UDPATE: A friend who knows the NRA bylaws far better than me just pointed out something about this special meeting. According to Article IV, Section 3 (b), while the President, the Executive Committee, or the majority of the Board can call a special meeting, it has a notification requirement.

From the NRA Bylaws:

Notice of the time, place, and object of such special meetings shall be mailed to each Director at least 30 days before the date of holding such meetings.

Now I know that the NRA Bylaws don’t mean much to Wayne and company but you would think that given both the dissolution lawsuit and the bankruptcy proceedings that dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s just might be the smart way to go. I don’t know if the Board is getting their advice from William Brewer III, NRA General Counsel John Frazer, or the Board’s attorney Wit Davis but whomever said it was OK to ignore the bylaws either doesn’t give a big rat’s ass or is an idiot.

Either way, anything voted on and decided in this Special Meeting of the Board could be challenged in court as being invalid due to violating the bylaws.

NATO Standardizes 5.7×28 Cartridge

FN America is reporting that NATO has decided to standardize the 5.7×28 cartridge. This should be good news for both FN and Ruger as they both manufacture handguns in that caliber. I know CMMG has the Banshee AR pistol in 5.7 so I wouldn’t be surprised to see more ARs coming out as either pistols or carbines in that caliber.

From FN’s release sent out this morning:

FN America, LLC is pleased to announce that the FN-designed 5.7x28mm caliber has been standardized by NATO. The caliber was designed in the late 1980s for use with the FN P90® and FN Five-seveN® pistol. With almost three decades of trusted use, the FN 5.7x28mm continues to leverage the groundbreaking design to improve range, accuracy and terminal performance from small arms. As NATO adds the FN 5.7x28mm to their standard small caliber ammunition portfolio, FN proudly continues its long legacy of small arm innovation as it enhances service to civilians, law enforcement, and militaries across the globe.

In a continuous effort to promote interchangeability of all small caliber ammunition used by allied armed forces, NATO has recently finalized the standardization process of the FN®-designed 5.7x28mm caliber by approving the standardization agreement (STANAG) 4509.

The 5.7x28mm caliber is now integrated into the Multi-Caliber Manual Of Proof and Inspection (AEP-97) and joins the standardized NATO small caliber ammunition portfolio, along with the 9x19mm NATO, the 5.56x45mm NATO, the 7.62x51mm NATO and the 12.7x99mm NATO (also widely known as the .50 caliber).

As a NATO standardized caliber, the 5.7x28mm provides armies with the guarantee of interchangeability between ammunition from different manufacturers and operational efficiency in weapons of this caliber.

Every Picture Tells A Story, Part X

Less than a week after Utah became the 17th state to adopt constitutional or permitless concealed carry, Montana became the 18th. Thanks again to Rob Vance, we have the picture showing the growth of freedom.

Gov. Greg Gianforte (R-MT) signed House Bill 102 on Thursday, February 18th. The bill extended permitless carry to incorporated towns and cities within Montana.

Gov. Gianforte said at the signing ceremony, according to the Montana Free Press:

“Our Second Amendment is very clear: The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed,” Gianforte said at a bill signing ceremony Thursday afternoon. “Every law-abiding Montanan should be able to defend themselves and their loved ones.”

The exceptions contained in the bill include secure police facilities, Federal buildings, courtrooms, and K-12 schools. Note that universities are not included in that list.

Additionally, the measure forbids the state university system from restricting firearm possession on campuses beyond requiring gun owners to have safety training akin to a hunter’s education course and safety measures such as requiring that firearms be transported in cases and stored with gun locks. The university system will also be allowed to forbid gun possession by students who have been formally disciplined for substance abuse or “interpersonal violence,” and prohibit possession by attendees at football games and other events that are supervised by armed security guards.

The university’s Board of Regents are reportedly studying the bill to see whether they plan to challenge it insofar as it applies to universities. However, as the governor’s press secretary said, ““The Board of Regents has the authority to oversee and manage the university system, but it does not have the authority to take away Montanans’ constitutional rights.”

If things continue along the path they are on, Tennessee may become the 19th state to adopt permitless carry. That would be very significant as it would add 6.8 million more citizens not having to ask government permission to exercise their right to bear arms.

Mind Your Own Knitting

I came across a tweet from Everytown’s favorite demanding mom this morning and the comments could just write themselves.

Then there is the last sentence in her tweet: “I’m not a natural.” I think we all knew that!

Judge Says Time To Act Like Adults

US District Court Judge Joe Fish has ordered mandatory mediation in the case between the NRA and AckMac that is pending in US District Court for the Northern District of Texas. He has told all parties that they have 30 days to set a mediation date or the mediator will do it for them.

The named parties shall be present during the entire mediation process and each party which is not a natural person must be represented by an executive officer (other than in-house counsel) with authority to negotiate a settlement (the authority required shall be active, i.e., not merely the authority to observe the mediation proceedings but the authority to negotiate, demand or offer, and bind the party represented). Counsel and the parties shall proceed in a good faith effort to try to resolve this case

As I read that, it means the both Wayne LaPierre and Revan McQueen must be present for the entire proceedings.

To make sure they play nice, Judge Fish has said he will order sanctions if the parties involved don’t “comply in good faith.”

The Lawsuit That Keeps On Giving

The lawsuit and counter-lawsuit between the NRA and Ackerman McQueen is the lawsuit that keeps on giving. Reading the amended complaint filed yesterday by Ackerman McQueen is like reading about one of those Hollywood celebrity divorce cases but only better.

I give you the first three sections of AckMac’s “SECOND AMENDED THIRD-PARTY COMPLAINT AGAINST WAYNE LAPIERRE & THE NRA FOUNDATION, INC.” The Complementary Spouse said to me when I started snorting that it must have been funny.

This Third-Party Complaint arises from a series of ethically questionable
undertakings by the NRA through its longtime leader Executive Vice President and CEO, Wayne LaPierre (“LaPierre”). As a result of his authoritarian management style, love of money and power, and deep personal paranoia, today, LaPierre has reduced the NRA to a cult of personality as he continues to waste membership funds on media stunts and serial litigation with only one purpose: to save his own skin.

Through the intricate financial arrangements he constructed over decades with very little oversight from the NRA Board of Directors or other executives, LaPierre was able to obtain millions of dollars in personal benefits by keeping vendors and the NRA’s own accounting
department in the dark about his personal spending. As the gathering storm clouds of a possible investigation by the New York Attorney General (“NYAG”) started to form in 2018, LaPierre became concerned the details of his financial adventurism may come to light.

LaPierre sought assistance from lawyer/media-darling, William A. Brewer III (“Brewer”), and his law firm/public-relations firm, Brewer Attorneys & Counselors (the “Brewer Firm”), who together with LaPierre’s Chief of Staff, Joshua Powell (“Powell”), formulated a plan
to pin all liability on a convenient scapegoat, deflect media attention from LaPierre’s malfeasance and failed NRA programs, and maintain LaPierre’s domination of the NRA. Many of the resulting actions were made possible by LaPierre’s paranoia and guilty conscience, as he repeatedly proclaimed that Brewer was the only one who “could keep him out of jail.” By fantastic coincidence, Brewer determined that it was AMc—a company owned by his own father-in-law— who could be blamed for all of the NRA’s malfeasance and financial woes. In return for deflecting the spotlight from LaPierre, Brewer was given free rein to reap a financial windfall in exorbitant attorney fees, displace his father-in-law’s company as the public-relations firm for the NRA, and set up AMc as the perfect “fall guy.

It was the “lawyer/media-darling” characterization of William Brewer III that had me in stitches.

While all of this is somewhat humorous to read, the sad thing is that from everything I’ve heard that Wayne LaPierre is paranoid and let Brewer be his “Rasputin” in an effort to save his own skin.

The ones to suffer from all of this will not be Wayne, Bill Brewer, or AckMac. It will be the ordinary NRA members who gave their hard-earned monies to the organization in order to protect their God-given right to self-defense as enshrined in the Second Amendment. Just when it is needed most, the NRA’s attention is on its series of lawsuits against AckMac and its bankruptcy stunt.

You can read the whole complaint here.

“She Works Hard For The Money”

The latest filings in the NRA’s bankruptcy case contain a treasure trove of information. This is especially true for the NRA’s statement of financial affairs. It goes well beyond a mere balance sheet and includes a complete list of payments and distributions to insiders. Insiders would be the officers of the NRA as well as all members of the Board of Directors.

Reading through the list, most of the payments are recruiter payments. While I might quibble on whether or not directors or their organizations should be compensated for bringing in new members, it is a relatively minor thing and the amount of money was not material (using an accounting term).

Bearing in mind that 2020 was a horrible year, financially and otherwise, for many people, there is one person who did rather well in 2020.

Marion Hammer.

Ms. Hammer received $246,500 in direct payments for “consulting services”. In addition, she received another $183,600 in indirect payments made to United Sportsmen of Florida for a “consulting agreement.” (See pages 53 and 54 of the NRA’s filing.)

As Donna Summer sang, “She works hard for the money.
So you better treat her right.”

Being Wayne LaPierre’s No. 1 defender and attack cat (she is a cat person) is hard work. He must have thought so which is why she got $430,100 of member’s money in an effort to treat her right.