North Dakota Is Now Lucky 13

North Dakota became the 13th state to have constitutional concealed carry signed into law. Yesterday, Gov. Doug Burgum (R-ND) signed House Bill 1169. As the excerpts from the governor’s press release below make clear, it only applies to North Dakota residents. Out-of-staters will still need a carry permit if they wish to carry concealed.

From Gov. Burgum’s press release:

BISMARCK, N.D. – Governor Doug Burgum today signed legislation allowing law-abiding citizens to carry a concealed handgun if they have possessed a valid North Dakota driver’s license or state ID card for at least a year.

The “constitutional carry” authority provided under House Bill 1169 applies only within North Dakota’s borders. Those wanting concealed carry reciprocity with other states must apply for a Class 1 or Class 2 North Dakota concealed weapon license, for which the requirements remain unchanged.

Current law only requires an applicant for a Class 2 license to complete an open-book test, at a cost of up to $50, and undergo a criminal history records check. Class 1 licenses require firearms training and additional requirements. Both licenses carry a $60 application fee.

Under HB 1169, anyone who is eligible to possess a Class 2 firearm license and has had a valid driver’s license or state ID card for at least a year may carry a concealed firearm. Law enforcement officials recommended the state ID language, as well as the bill’s requirement that anyone carrying a concealed weapon inform law enforcement of the weapon during a traffic stop or other contact.

Someone who has been convicted of a felony or crime of violence will still be precluded from carrying a handgun under this new law. Individuals who initiate the purchase of a handgun from a federally licensed dealer are still required to undergo a federal background check, which runs their name and descriptive information through three national databases.

“North Dakota has a rich heritage of hunting and a culture of deep respect for firearm safety. As a hunter and gun owner myself, I strongly support gun rights for law-abiding citizens,” Burgum said. “House Bill 1169 allows citizens to exercise their Second Amendment right under the U.S. Constitution. It also is consistent with the North Dakota Constitution, which declares in Article I that all individuals have the inalienable right ‘to keep and bear arms for the defense of their person, family, property, and the state, and for lawful hunting, recreational, and other lawful purposes, which shall not be infringed.’ ”

At the same time, Burgum – who has a Class 1 concealed weapons license that requires applicants to demonstrate firearms proficiency – noted that neither the existing Class 2 requirements nor HB 1169 have a firearms training component. He encouraged anyone considering carrying a concealed weapon to enroll in one of North Dakota’s many certified gun safety courses.

“Gun ownership is both a right and a responsibility, and that responsibility begins with individuals and families,” Burgum said.

House Bill 1169 passed the State House with a vote of 83 yeas to 9 nays and the State Senate by a vote of 34 yeas to 13 nays. No law enforcement organization or group opposed the law when it came before the legislature. The bill itself may be seen here.

According to the Bismarck Tribune, the number of carry permits in the state more than doubled in the past five years to over 48,000 permits.

A similar bill passed the South Dakota legislature but it has been or will be vetoed by Gov. Dennis Daugaard (R-SD). Unfortunately, it does not appear that the majorities that passed the bill are not high enough to override the governor’s veto. Gov. Daugaard has said he thinks the present process is sufficient and that “the inconvenience to the law-abiding citizen is so minimal.”

New Hampshire Becomes 12th State With Constitutional Carry

Gov. Chris Sununu (R-NH) signed a bill today making New Hampshire the 12th state to have permitless concealed carry. The bill he signed had been vetoed in each of the preceding two years by then-Gov. Maggie Hassan (D-NH).

There are a number of other states where constitutional concealed carry bills have been introduced this year including both North Carolina and Texas. My fellow co-host on the Polite Society Podcast, Rachel Malone, is leading the charge in Texas.

From the NRA-ILA on the New Hampshire signing ceremony:

Today, in a private signing ceremony, Governor Chris Sununu signed Senate Bill 12 into law. Similar legislation had been vetoed by former Governor Maggie Hassan for two years in a row, but thanks to your active involvement, law-abiding gun owners will now be able to carry their firearms without a required permit in the state of New Hampshire! This law goes into effect immediately. Please take the time to thank your state legislators for passing this important legislation and Governor Sununu for signing it into law.

Sponsored by Senator Jeb Bradley (R-3), SB 12 will repeal the license requirement to carry a concealed pistol or revolver, unless a person is otherwise prohibited. For those who choose to obtain licenses, SB 12 will also increase the length of time in which a license is valid from four years to five years.

In New Hampshire, existing state law recognizes the right of any citizen who can legally own and possess a firearm to carry it openly, either loaded or unloaded, anywhere in the state not prohibited by law. However, if a firearm becomes covered by a coat or if a woman prefers to carry a firearm for protection in her purse, he or she would need a concealed carry handgun license. The new law will extend permitless open carry to permitless concealed carry, allowing law-abiding gun owners to protect themselves and their loved ones in the manner that best suits their needs.

Keep your fingers crossed and your calls to legislators coming in that more states will adopt this.

GRNC: HB 69 – Constitutional Carry – Needs Your Help

HB 69 was introduced in the North Carolina House of Representatives earlier this month. It provides for permitless concealed carry just as we have permitless or constitutional open carry in the state. It was introduced by Rep. Larry Pittman (R-Cabarrus) and has been referred to the Judiciary I Committee. That last part is not good for the bill’s chances of success and Grass Roots North Carolina has issued an alert requesting it be moved to the Judiciary II Committee where it will receive a fair hearing.

11 states now have constitutional carry and it looks like New Hampshire will be joining the list if Gov. Chris Sununu (R-NH) keeps his promise to sign the bill which has passed both houses of the legislature. That would make the three northern New England states bastions of freedom unlike the southern three.

GIVE HB 69 A FAIR HEARING!



As you know, Representative LARRY PITTMAN
(R-Cabarrus) 
introduced House Bill 69 (with GRNC’s feedback and support) to restore
our rights to constitutional (permitless) carry. The primary sponsors
of the
bill include Reps. MICHAEL
SPECIALE
(R-Beaufort, Craven, Pamlico), BEVERLY BOSWELL (R-Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Washington),  and JAY ADAMS (R-Catawba).

Since its introduction, HP 69 currently resides in House Judiciary I which is chaired
by Representative TED DAVIS,
JR
.  We have reported his
actions in previous GRNC Alerts
and feel strongly that HB 69, if it stays in House Judiciary I under Rep. Davis, will be in danger of being
stopped.

GRNC
feels strongly that the seriousness of this bill deserves a fair hearing
and is asking everyone to contact your representatives to urge them to
move
HB 69 to House Judiciary II,
chaired by Representative JOHN M.
BLUST
.

To
recap the details of HB 69
(“Constitutional Carry Act”) and the reasons for GRNC’s support:
  • Establishes a new Article 54C, under which handguns may be carried concealed without
    permits;
  • Removes the need
    to have a concealed handgun permit to carry a concealed handgun in
    restaurants, public assemblies, parades and funerals, and (with the same
    limitations as currently in law) onto educational properties;
  • and Retains the current CHP system for purposes of reciprocity with other states.
HB
69 is designed to be a “clean”
reciprocity bill (i.e. without other measures) in order to draw fewer
objections from potential supporters. GRNC will shepherd the
introduction of
additional legislative initiatives in other bills.

IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUIRED!

  • CONTACT SPEAKER TIM MOORE and CHAIRMAN DAVID LEWIS at:

    919-733-3451, Tim.Moore@ncleg.net
    919-715-3015, David.Lewis@ncleg.net


    Tell them to move HB 69 from House Judiciary I to House Judiciary
    II
    in order for it to receive the fair hearing it deserves. You can use the
    copy/paste text below, under ‘Deliver This Message,’ to send an email
    message
    to Speaker Moore and Chairman Lewis.
  • CONTACT CHAIRMAN JOHN M. BLUST at:
    919-733-5781,
    John.Blust@ncleg.net

    Urge him to work with Speaker Moore to take the HB 69 into his
    committee
    and give it the fair hearing it deserves.  You can use the copy/paste text below, under ‘Deliver This Message,’ to send an email message to Representative
    Blust.
     

DELIVER THIS MESSAGE


Here are two suggested messages to deliver:
Suggested Subject: “Give HB 69 a fair hearing and move
to House Judiciary II
”  
Dear [Speaker Moore or Chairman Lewis]:
House
Bill 69, sponsored by Reps. Larry Pittman, Michael Speciale, Beverly
Boswell, and Jay
Adams, has been introduced and currently resides in House Judiciary I,
chaired by Rep. Ted David, Jr. I feel that Rep. Davis will not give
the bill
the fair hearing it deserves and urge you to please move it to House
Judiciary II chaired by Rep. John M. Blust.

A powerful trend is sweeping across
the
United States in which eleven states have now adopted (or previously
had) statutes under which lawful citizens could carry firearms for
self-protection without obtaining burdensome permits.

The states with
permitless concealed carry now include Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho,
Kansas,
Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming.
Indeed, Missouri’s law went into effect on January 1, and West
Virginia’s went into effect in May. Additionally, more limited versions
of permitless carry exist in Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and
Oklahoma.

It is high time North Carolina joined those enlightened states
by relieving lawful North Carolinians from expensive and burdensome
permit
requirements which discriminate against people with lesser means.
Accordingly, I ask you to give a prompt hearing to HB 69
(“Constitutional
Carry Act”).

Each time we have expanded concealed carry – whether
into parks, restaurants, educational property or elsewhere –
naysayers have predicted gloom and doom. Each time, they have been
wrong. In fact, I am aware of no instance in any of the states which
have adopted
constitutional carry in which it has caused problems.

Again, I urge you to
give HB 69 a fair hearing and move it from Rep. Davis and House
Judiciary I
to House Judiciary II and Rep. Blust. I will be monitoring this issue
through Grass Roots North Carolina legislative alerts.

Respectfully,

Suggested Subject: “Please work with Speaker Moore and give HB 69 a fair
hearing in House House Judiciary II

Dear House Chairman Blust:

House Bill 69, sponsored by Reps. Larry Pittman, Michael
Speciale,
Beverly Boswell, and Jay Adams, has been introduced and currently
resides in House Judiciary I, chaired by Rep. Ted David, Jr. I feel
that Rep.
Davis will not give the bill the fair hearing it deserves and urge you
to please work with Speaker Moore to move it to House Judiciary II under
your
leadership.

As you know, Rep. Blust, a powerful trend is sweeping across
the United States in which eleven states have now adopted (or previously
had)
statutes under which lawful citizens could carry firearms for
self-protection without obtaining burdensome permits.

The states with permitless
concealed
carry now include Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Maine,
Mississippi, Missouri, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Indeed,
Missouri’s law went into effect on January 1, and West Virginia’s went
into effect in May. Additionally, more limited versions of
permitless carry exist in Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and
Oklahoma.

It is high time North Carolina joined those enlightened states by
relieving
lawful North Carolinians from expensive and burdensome permit
requirements which discriminate against people with lesser means.

Each time we have
expanded concealed carry – whether into parks, restaurants, educational
property or elsewhere – naysayers have predicted gloom and doom.
Each time, they have been wrong. In fact, I am aware of no instance in
any of the states which have adopted constitutional carry in which it
has
caused problems.

Again, I urge you to work with Speaker Moore to move HB
69 to your House Judiciary Committee, House Judiciary II, to give it the
fair
hearing it deserves. I will be monitoring this issue through Grass
Roots North Carolina legislative alerts.

Respectfully,

Sincerely,

Every Picture Tells A Story, Part VI

With the Show-Me State becoming the 11th state to adopt some form of constitutional carry, Rob Vance has updated the graphic we’ve been publishing since 2011. The latest graphic shifts Missouri from shall-issue concealed carry to constitutional concealed carry. They already had open carry.

Back in April, I said that I might have to update what I said a few years ago. To wit, that shall-issue is the new norm. I concluded that I might have to change this to constitutional carry is the new norm. I think that might be going a little far but one can always hope.

My fellow co-host of the Polite Society Podcast Rachel Malone is very active in Republican politics at the state level in Texas. She said in our last podcast that the Texas State Republican Executive Committee had adopted constitutional carry as one of their key legislative priorities in 2017. Imagine how the blue area would expand if the second largest state by both size and population adopted constitutional carry!

To illustrate how much things have changed since the original graphic was published, I am reposting the graphic. No issue (the red area) has gone to virtually nil and unrestricted (blue area) has grown exponentially.

Missouri Goes Constitutional Carry On January 1st

The Missouri General Assembly overrode the earlier veto by Gov. Jay Nixon (D-MO) of Senate Bill 656 which now allows any person legally entitled to possess a firearm to carry that firearm without a permit. SB 656 also created lifetime carry permits, expanded both the castle doctrine and stand your ground protections, gave military members a longer period of time to renew their permits, and limits the cost of a permit to $100. The bill did not do away with permits but made the need for one pretty much irrelevant.

The override vote in the Senate was 24-6 and 112-41 in the House of Representatives. The official roll call vote breakdown of the Senate override has not been published as of yet.

The provisions of SB 656 with the exception of constitutional carry become effective in 30 days. Constitutional carry will not become effective until January 1, 2017. SB 656 rewrote Section 571.130 of the Missouri Revised Statutes which previously made it a crime to carry a weapon including a firearm concealed without a permit. The revision now makes it a crime to carry a concealed weapon in places where it is forbidden by Section 571.107. These places include correctional facilities, police stations, polling places on Election Day, court houses, and the like.

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Gov. Nixon and other Democrats contend this will make the state less safe:

Nixon has said the bill would make the state less safe by taking power away from local law enforcement, who under current law issue permits to citizens who have completed a firearm safety training course and passed a background check.

Getting weapons without training raised a red flag even for gun-friendly Democrats.

“I don’t think it’s a burden to take an eight-hour course to understand the dos and the don’ts, the shoulds and the shouldn’ts, of carrying a loaded firearm,” said Sen. Jason Holsman, D-Kansas City, who waved his own concealed carry permit while speaking on the Senate floor.

St. Louis lawmakers said the lack of training would make the city more dangerous.

“We’re putting citizens in the place of law enforcement who have training and skills and experience,” said Rep. Kim Gardner, a Democrat who is set to become the next St. Louis circuit attorney.

Sponsoring Sen. Brian Munzlinger, R-Williamstown, said the bill would give law-abiding Missourians the right to conceal and carry in places that already allow permitless open carry. It will take effect in 2017.

The video below from KMOV St Louis shows some of the debate over the bill’s override in the House. St. Rep. Stacey Newman (D-St. Louis), the reigning poster girl of Mayor Bloomberg’s Demanding Mommies, says “the bill we just passed will ensure, guarantee it, more gun deaths.”

KMOV.com

Every Picture Tells A Story, Part V

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter (R-ID) signed “permitless” concealed carry (aka constitutional carry) into law on March 27th. It allows Idaho citizens age 21 and over to carry concealed without a permit within city limits. They already had this right outside city limits. This made Idaho the ninth state to have constitutional carry.

On Tuesday, the Mississippi House of Representatives concurred with the Mississippi Senate on amendments to HB 786. The Senate amendments expanded what was originally just a church carry bill into one that included that and constitutional carry. The amended bill passed both houses with veto proof majorities. The bill now goes to Gov. Phil Bryant (R-MS) who is expected to sign the bill. That would make Mississippi the tenth state to have constitutional carry and the third to pass it this year. Some have criticized the bill as also including “nullification”.  Actually the bill doesn’t include nullification as it merely states that Mississippi officials and law enforcement don’t have an obligation to enforce Federal gun control laws which is in line with existing Supreme Court precedent.

Given that the number of states with constitutional carry has increased to 10, Rob Vance and I concluded it was time to update the graphic showing the spread of freedom. The graphic below shows how the United States has moved from no carry to shall-issue and permitless carry over the last 30 years. As I said a few years ago, shall-issue is the new norm. Maybe one day I’ll be able to change this to constitutional carry is the new norm.

Here are the population statistics that accompany the above graphic:

0.4% No Issue, HI
27.0% May Issue, CA,DC,MD,MA,NJ,NY,RI
65.4% Shall Issue
7.2% Unrestricted, AK,AR,AZ,ID,KS,ME,MS,VT,WV,WY

At the same time that shall-issue and permitless or constitutional carry have expanded, violent crime has decreased. While correlation isn’t causation, I do think this is significant. When this graphic was first developed, Rob noted that there was no positive correlation between carry and violent crime. Unfortunately, he also noted that a negative correlation has not yet been proved. Linoge at Walls of the City has been studying gun ownership and the incidence of violent crime for a number of years. His latest is posted here. He has a similar result. Thus, neither more guns or less restrictive carry means more crime.

Every Picture Tells A Story, Part Four

I published Every Picture Tells A Story, Part Three last Wednesday. It was an update of the 2011 post that tracked the spread of firearms freedom as evidenced by the growth in shall-issue and constitutional carry. It was released on October 15th to commemorate the effective date of constitutional carry in the state of Maine.

Also published in 2011 was another collaboration with Rob Vance called Every Picture Tells A Story, Part Two which plotted annual FBI violent crime rates against the growth of shall-issue concealed carry. We explicitly stated back then that there wasn’t a positive correlation between violent crime rates and liberalized carry laws. We also said that proving a negative correlation would take more a more rigorous statistical approach. However, we took note of Linoge’s work regarding the negative correlation between crime involving firearms and gun ownership. I would note that Linoge has updated his work and the negative correlation is even stronger in 2015 (-0.8016) than in 2011.

Rob has updated his graph to reflect the changes since 2011 in both crime rates and the growth of shall-issue and constitutional carry.

When Illinois, the fifth largest state in the US, was forced to adopt shall-issue concealed carry, the anti-rights movement predicted blood in the streets of Chicago and elsewhere in Illinois. That is, more blood than is normal in Chicago with its long history of stringent gun control. The graph above normalizes the crime rates as per 100,000. If shall-issue concealed carry would have caused an increase in crime rates in Illinois, it would have shown up in the graph.

Rob notes this about the graph and what it illustrates:

Every time the citizens of our states manage to convince their legislators that individual self-defense via unrestricted or shall issue concealed carry is the best approach, the press repeats the shibboleth that such laws will result in “blood in the streets.” Well, the press has been wrong about that, and they’ve been wrong repeatedly and over many many years. Then again, newspaper circulation is down and this kind of lazy reporting might be one of the reasons why. Violent crime rates, including the murder rates, are down in the United States from a peak in the early 1990’s, but you wouldn’t know it from our press. The diagram below starts with data gathered to demonstrate the change in state laws in favor of no or de minimis regulation of concealed carry of firearms for self-defense (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1QxBfs9acTUH8hL1OtkitcivuCzr4IQKjKOQ4_obK61c/pubhtml), and integrates FBI Uniform Crime Reporting data on the national level of violent crime over time.

Concealed carry laws matter because they change the balance of power in the favor of law abiding citizens over violent criminals, increasing both the real and the perceived risk associated with criminal behavior. Over the last 25 plus years the rate of violent crimes in the US has fallen substantially, and this change runs directly counter to the increasing availability of concealed carry as a self-defense option for Americans. We are now experiencing lowered rates of violent crime last seen in the early 1970s and murder rates from the mid-1960s. As John Lott has written (extensively I might add), “More Guns = Less Crime.” Correlation isn’t causality is a truth from statistics; yet it is entirely truthful to say that the normalization of armed self-defense is taking place in a period when the rate of violent crime is falling in the US. Any other conclusion does not follow the data.

Links to our data sources are below:

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/04/17/despite-lower-crime-rates-support-for-gun-rights-increases

https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/ucr

http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/uscrime.htm

Every Picture Tells A Story, Part Three

Four years ago Rob Vance and I collaborated on a post showing the progress of concealed carry from 1986 through 2011. The post was anchored by a graphic that showed the growth in shall-issue carry and constitutional carry as a percentage of the United State population. At that time, approximately two-thirds of all Americans lived in a state that allowed either shall-issue or constitutional carry. In other words, shall-issue had become the new normal as it continues to be.

Effective October 15th, Maine becomes the seventh state to have constitutional carry. Rob thought now would be a good time to revisit this advancement of freedom and gun rights. I agree because that two-thirds of all Americans in 2011 has become three-fourths of all Americans in 2015.

As Rob explains:

The sea change in the legal status of concealed carry in the United States described below in graphic form follows a still ongoing grass roots effort at the state level, yet with national implications. There is now a fundamental recognition by the American public that giving advantages to criminals over law-abiding citizens, by means of law, is a logical and moral error. This realization has driven the liberalization of state level laws regarding concealed carry since Florida led the way in the modern era beginning in 1987. Twenty-six years later, Illinois became the last state with a de jure ban on concealed carry – passing “shall issue” legislation allowing legalized concealed carry for its citizens as a result of losing Moore v. Madigan and Shepard v. Madigan in the 7th US Circuit Court of Appeals. First permits under the new law were issued in 2014 in that state. The restoration of this fundamental freedom will continue by legislation where we can and by litigation where we cannot.

The two biggest changes shown in the graphic below are the addition of Illinois to the shall-issue column and the growth of constitutional carry from just two small states (Vermont and Alaska) to a total of seven today.

Rob and I are working on an update to Every Picture Tells A Story, Part Two as well as new effort called The Next Wave. This new effort will examine the growth of constitutional carry and its chances in states where it has been introduced but either not passed or vetoed by the governor.

Given that neither Rob nor I believe in hiding our data nor how we put things into categories, you can see it in this appendix.

As of October 15, 2015 here’s the box score in detail state by
state:
Unrestricted Carry States (5.1 %
US population)
Alaska,
Arkansas, Arizona, Kansas, Maine (as of 10/15/15), Vermont, and Wyoming
Shall Issue States (67.5 %
US population)
Alabama,
Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska,
Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio,
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas,
Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin
May Issue States (27 %
US population)
California (some counties are
effectively No Issue, and others are much more permissive), Connecticut (*since
2013 I have accounted this as May Issue, as local conditions have changed from
permissive to much less so), Delaware, District of Columbia (obviously not a
state, but treated as one for this analysis), Maryland, Massachusetts, New
Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island
No Issue State (.4 %
US population)
Hawaii (the legal status of Hawaii
is such that while permits are legally available, none are issued, which is why
it is counted as No Issue in this analysis, rather than fitting into the May
Issue category which it’s legislation warrants).
A word or two on definition of terms used in this analysis/graphic:
UNRESTRICTED: no permit is required
to carry a concealed firearm, aka Constitutional Carry
SHALL ISSUE: permit required but
the state is obligated to issue a permit if the applicant meets certain
criteria (age, no felony record, no drug arrests, etc.); i.e., the state has no
discretion.
MAY ISSUE: permit required but
local authorities (e.g. sheriffs’ offices) have discretion in the form of
requirements above and beyond what the state requires.
NO ISSUE: private citizens are
effectively prohibited from carrying firearms for self-defense outside the home
Find the detail data here:
See also:
Thanks also to Jeff Dege at 
http://www.gun-nuttery.com.

As Maine Goes…

There is an old saying that says, “As Maine Goes, So Goes the Nation.” One could only help that they continue being a bellweather state when it comes to gun rights.

Today, Gov. Paul LePage (R-ME) signed LD 652 which makes Maine the latest constitutional carry state. While constitutional carry went into effect on July 1st in Kansas, New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan (D-NH) vetoed a similar constitutional carry bill on Monday. She had promised the Demanding Mommies she’d veto the law when it crossed her desk.

The text of the bill can be found here. It will go into effect 90 days after the legislature adjourns for the session.

The NRA-ILA just released a couple of news items on the bill’s signing. They can be found here and here.

Earl Ray Says No To Constitutional Carry In The Mountaineer State

West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (D-WV) vetoed SB 347 this morning it was in the interest of public safety. SB 347 which passed both houses of the West Virginia legislature by overwhelming majorities. The bill would have made the state the fifth to adopt constitutional carry. While open carry is legal without a permit, concealed carry permits require mandated training and cost $105.

From Tomblin’s press release:

“Throughout my career, I have strongly supported the Second Amendment, as demonstrated by my repeated endorsements and high grades from the National Rifle Association. However, I must also be responsive to the apprehension of law enforcement officers from across the state, who have concerns about the bill as it relates to the safety of their fellow officers. It also would eliminate the required gun safety training courses for those applying for a concealed carry permit. In light of these concerns and in the interest of public safety for all West Virginians, I have vetoed Senate Bill 347.”

Another politician who had received high grades from the NRA at one time, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV), was already under fire for his opposition to SB 347 in which he said West Virginians believed in “gunsense”. That is one of the code words popular with Shannon Watts and the Everytown Moms for Illegal Mayors. The Firearms Policy Coalition said that Manchin who claims to be a Life member of the NRA needs to be booted from the organization. As Sebastian noted today, he’s not sure West Virginians much care for Manchin and we’ll find out for sure in 2018.

The West Virginia Citizen’s Defense League hasn’t not commented publicly on the veto yet and are still considering their options. However, their Facebook page has a very active comment thread on it. It appears that a veto override will require a special session of the legislature.

Legislators on both sides of the aisle are indicating that they will vote in favor of the bill when it comes up again.

Del. Rupie Phillips (D-Logan, 24) supported the legislation in the House of Delegates and promised to do so again.

“We spent a lot of time on this issue and I hate that we’re going to have to spend time again on it at the beginning of next year’s session,” Phillips said.

Meanwhile, Del. Mike Folk (R-Berkeley, 63) has said the bill will come up again in the next session. He also dismissed the supposed concern that it would put law enforcement at risk.

He dismissed claims that it would have put law enforcement officers at risk. “They assume (already) that every person is armed, so the safety issue is not a good argument,” Folk said.

He is promising to bring the proposal up again during next year’s Regular Legislative Session.

“We’ll do it again next year and we’ll make sure we do it early enough that he can veto it next year and the same thing that happened with the pain capable bill will happen with this bill,” Folk said, referencing this year’s legislative override of Gov. Tomblin’s veto of the bill that would have banned abortions in West Virginia after 20 weeks.

Given the overwhelming majorities in favor of the bill, 71-29 in the House and 30-4 in the Senate, I think it is a safe bet that when it comes up again, it will pass.